Virtual Realities in Culture:

Explorations of the African Diaspora Project

Overview

Virtual Realities in Culture:
Explorations of the African Diaspora Project

This is a virtual reality (VR) storytelling experience that will allow elementary and middle school students to realize a historical, multi-sensory experience through the use of virtual reality technology built by high school students.

This presentation is built with Mozilla A-Frame a web framework for building virtual reality experiences. The virtual reality experience can be seen via a desktop using click and drag, can be opened on a smartphone and use the device motion sensors or plug in a VR headset, specificallly the Rift, Viva or Google Headsets.

Let's Explore

Select An Experience

Quindaro Ruins

Quandaro Ruins is a journey that takes us through the historic town of Old Quindaro whew the culture was FREEDOM!

This site tells the story of the African Americans who lived in Old Town Quindaro - now known as Kansas City, Kansaas (KCK). The story begins at the Missouri River and is the beginning of the Underground Railroad. It is a historical jewel in KCK where now, through this VR experience, global students have access to the richness and stories of African American culture.

John Brown House

John Brown House is the journey through a historic house where the culture was JUSTICE!

The site is critical to the story of the Abolitionist John Brown and his connection to the U.S. Civil War; and the relationship between Missouri, a slave State, and Kansas, a free State. The house was a station on the Underground Railroad and used by John Brown, as his headquarters.

Brown vs. Board

Brown v. Board of Education is a journey through a historic site where the culture was EQUALITY!

  The Monroe Elementary School site was one of four segregated black schools operating in Topeka. In 1951 a student of Monroe, Linda Brown, and her father, Oliver Brown, became plaintiffs in a legal battle over racial segregation. The case reached the Supreme Court, where it gained the name Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka.